Happy 5th Anniversary LA FPI Blog!

by Robin Byrd

Today is the 5th Anniversary for the LA FPI Blog.

My excitement over the diverse voices that frequent this blog never wanes.  Pick a few bloggers and read their articles.  Tell me what you think.

  1. Jessica Abrams (past blogger)
  2. Tiffany Antone
  3. Erica Bennett
  4. Nancy Beverly (past blogger)
  5. Jenn Bobiwash
  6. Andie Bottrell
  7. Robin Byrd
  8. Korama Danquah
  9. Kitty Felde
  10. Diane Grant
  11. Jen Huszcza (past blogger)
  12. Sara Israel (past blogger)
  13. Cindy Marie Jenkins (past blogger)
  14. Sue May (video blogger)
  15. Anna Nicholas (guest series blogger)
  16. Analyn Revilla
  17. Laura Shamas
  18. Madhuri Shekar
  19. Kimberly Shelby-Szyszko
  20. Cynthia Wands

 LAFPI Blog 3

 

 

2nd Annual SWAN Day Action Fest – A Success!

Saturday’s LA FPI SWAN Day Action Fest was packed!SwanLogo2

 

The City Garage Theatre is a lovely space.

Each reading was fantastic.  The talent in the room was magnetic -even the micro-reads which are done with minimal if any read-throughs prior to reading them in front of the audience were exciting!  Such FUN.

Thank you to everyone who made this event a success – you rock!

 

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Happy Support Women Artists Now Day!

Presented by Free Association Theatre with Los Angeles Female Playwrights Initiative, hosted by City Garage Theatre.

SWAN Day Action Fest 2015 It’s TODAY  —  SWAN Day Action Fest!

Come on out and celebrate with us!

Bring some pages and sign up for the micro-reads.

Calling all LA female playwrights
 (and screenwriters): Let’s read your work!
Bring 1 page for our Micro-Reads. 

Click Here for Guidelines.

View Action Fest Line Up Here.

Tomorrow is SWAN Day!!

Where: City Garage Theatre at Bergamot Arts Center, 2525 Michigan Ave., Building T1, Santa Monica, CA 90404

When: Tomorrow/almost today, Saturday, 28 March from 12 – 6 pm

What:  SWAN Day Action Fest!

 

 

SWAN Day Action Fest (Saturday, March 28th 2015): a Festival of Women Playwrights & Directors

 

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Action Fest line up:

 

BOX by Robin Byrd, directed by Julianne Homokay

Synopsis: Elpis and Pandora are sisters.  There has been a death in the family.  What if they could have one last chance before they have to seal the box?

Elpis: Shanel Moore
Pandora: Gayla Johnson
Mother: Marlynne F. Cooley

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THE PROPOSAL by Carolina Rojas Moretti, directed by Laura Steinroeder

Synopsis: Benny was lost before finding his True North, but can he stop himself from destroying the compass?

Benny: Andrew Loviska
North/Lily: Renee Ulloa-McDonald
South/Mother:  Melanie Alexander
East/Employee:  Daniel Coronel
West/Niki: Megan Kim

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THE MIXING BOWL by Leslie Hardy, directed by Gloria Iseli

Synopsis: Stephanie thinks her partner Alicia’s parents are simply coming for a visit.  She’s in for a surprise.  Sometimes the ingredients of our lives do not make for a great recipe.

ALICIA: Trace Taylor
STEPHANIE: Amy Stoch

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MANKIND by Beverly Andrews, directed by Alexandra Meda

Synopsis: New parents have a serious discussion by the river’s edge and reaffirm the people they really are.

Elizabeth: Kat Johnston
Mitchell: Eric Toms

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THE MISSING STAIRCASE by Morna Murphy Martell, directed by Lane Allison

Synopsis: The Staten Island Ferry passes Ellis Island. A strange man tells about a staircase there that changed his life. One woman knows the secret of the missing staircase.

Woman: Constance Ball
Girl: Nili Segal
Man: Dean Farell Bruggeman

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ILL INFORMED by Raegan Payne, directed by Courtney Anne Buchan

Synopsis: Owen is bad at stalking. Olivia is bad at living. It’s fortunate they are meeting.

Owen: Tim Stafford
Olivia: Kristina Drager  

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Micro-Reads Actors:  Dylan Quercia, Pauline Schantzer, Anna Simone Scott, Tippi Thomas, Harriet Fisher and Tinks Lovelace

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 Come join us this Saturday, 28 March 2015 from 12 – 6 pm at City Garage Theatre located in the Bergamot Station Arts Center
2525 Michigan Ave., Building T1, Santa Monica, CA 90404

For more info: http://lafpi.com/events
FB Event here: https://www.facebook.com/events/898010020244015/
If you tweet we’re @TheLAFPI; we’re also on Instagram @thelafpi.  #SWANDay #LAFPI.
Also connect with our hosts, @CityGarage (Neil LaBute’s Break of Noon opens April 3 http://www.citygarage.org/). 

Support Women Artists Now – SWAN Day Action Fest 2015

SWAN Day Action Fest 2015 Join us for our second SWAN Day Action Fest this Saturday, 28 March from 12 – 6 pm at City Garage Theatre!

http://lafpi.com/events/  Presented by Free Association Theatre with Los Angeles Female Playwrights Initiative, hosted by City Garage Theatre at

Bergamot Station Arts Center
2525 Michigan Ave., Building T1, Santa Monica, CA 90404
( off of Cloverfield Blvd., between Olympic Blvd. & 10 Freeway)

Free Parking in Bergamot Station Arts Center. The complex opens at 11 a.m. on Saturdays. SWAN Day Action Fest audiences are encouraged to arrive early, and come and go throughout the day to visit the many art galleries.

Hope to see you there!

Tornados…

by Robin Byrd

There was a tornado in California mid December – a strange occurrence this side of the Rockies.  Out of the ordinary; it made me think of home and growing up in the midwest in tornado country; it made me think of the sirens going off and the treks to the basement to wait them out.  I was suddenly in remembrance of “the house that built me.”  All the experiences my midwestern background has bestowed upon me that inform my world.  We are who we are because of our experiences.

I may have southern nuances that pepper my work but I am a midwestern writer with a midwestern sound – a sound I inherited from the region that grew my sentiments.  I understand the tornado and its winds and thunder and lightening.  I know there is safety in the eye of the storm.  I know that the quiet in the midst of a storm builds hope and expectation…  I know the sun comes out after and we behold brighter days.

I enjoy traveling home to rejuvenate myself and though, nothing remains the same, it is good to remember where one comes from in order to stay the course of where one wants to go and to continue on regardless of the tornados…

 

Harmony…

by Robin Byrd

Having gone through an entire year striving for harmony, I find myself in these last few days 1) very excited about the coming year and what it will bring, and 2) nearly undone by the journey thus far – nearly but not completely… It has been hard getting out of my old skin and becoming…more…but it has also been enlightening.

Harmony is a coming together, a joining together, unification, agreement, accord, synchronization…

Harmony enhances the melody. All I need to do is keep my strings tuned and know when to play second fiddle even though I can play first.

2014 has been a year of going deep, of following the rabbit down that rabbit hole and experiencing the entirety of wonderland. Forcing myself to go with the flow has taken me to new levels in my writing. I have finally shed the last of my inhibitions; usually less inhibited when writing poetry, I have seen my recent pieces come to the page in more exacting ways since I have decided to “write it like poetry”. Scary and exciting and liberating…

2015 hints at being a very good year…

May your 2015 bring you harmony and growth and prosperity…

San Marcos and the Conference that Can…Part IV: The Black and Latino Playwrights Conference

by Robin Byrd

 

The Texas State Black and Latino Playwrights Conference is in its 12th year.  Eugene Lee is the Artistic Director for the conference.  Mr. Lee is an established actor, director and writer.  I have admired his work as an actor for years.  A fellow LA FPIer, Laura Shamas, told me about this conference and although my play did not get in that year, 2012, it was a finalist which warranted a call from Mr. Lee.  To have someone actually get your story and be able to pick it apart and see things you didn’t know you wrote into the piece was wonderful.

I went to the conference this year because I was needing to be in the room with other artists at work.  I really wanted to see the process.  I am so thankful that I went.  I learned a lot, made some friends and shook whatever that thing was that was on me keeping me from my computer.  I am hoping this conference stays around for a very long time, its a great place to get things done.

One of the first things Eugene Lee said at the conference was that he had all male playwrights but it was not intentional.  What I found very interesting was that all three of the plays were female-centered and very good vehicles for female actresses and the honored playwright’s play was directed by a woman.  It was a very good vibe.   I believe this conference can be great and am hoping that next year, more theater artists show up like I did just to see what they are doing…

The Black and Latino Playwrights Conference was established to fill a void where the voices of Black and Latino playwrights can be heard, nurtured and celebrated.  The plays can be about whatever the playwright deems stage worthy; it’s the voice of that playwright this is most important to this conference.  It’s a place where student artists can become familiar with the other voices that make up American Theater.  In this vein, the most rewarding part of the conference is to hear those diverse voices, to see those playwrights at work at their craft, and to watch the students jump in fully committed to the scripts.  Eugene Lee has a vision for the Black and Latino Playwrights Conference that can change the way minorities are viewed in Theater; his generous nurturing of the artists is greatly appreciated.  And too, the generosity and foresight of Texas State University at San Marcos to seek out Mr. Lee to start such a conference is awesome.  Thank you, Texas State! Thank you, Eugene Lee!

Every culture, in this multicultural place we call America, deserves a seat at the table. It’s places like San Marcos and this conference that can… that make room and give sustenance to playwrights kicking against the pricks….

Associate Artistic Directors for the conference are Joe Luis Cedillo and Nadine Mozon.  Production Manager for the conference is Shannon Richey (AEA).

Black and Latino Playwrights Conference

 

Black and Latino Playwrights Conference

 

San Marcos and the Conference that Can… Part III: Ted Shine

by Robin Byrd

 

The 2014 Black and Latino Playwrights Conference (BLPC) held in San Marcos, Texas at Texas State University honored, Texas playwright, Ted Shine with a Distinguished Achievement Award.

Ted Shine and Eugene Lee, Artistic Director for Black and Latino Playwrights Conference.

Ted Shine and Eugene Lee, Artistic Director for Black and Latino Playwrights Conference.

Dr. Shine is in his eighties now. He preferred ground travel to flying in for the conference; he preferred to let the younger theater artists sit on the panel discussion about “Swimming Up Mainstream” as an artist of color. However, being the hungry little children we were in that room, we begged a little.  No we were not to proud to beg and we were so blessed with his wisdom even if from his seat in the audience. I don’t normally gravitate to people but I really liked talking to Dr. Shine.  He shared a lot of information about perseverance and learning the craft of writing plays.  He was so humble.

“Contribution” by Ted Shine is a play about the Civil Rights movement – the sit-ins to be exact. It is one of three one-acts in a collection titled “Contributions” which includes the plays: Platoon, Shoes and, Contribution. First presented in 1969 by the Negro Ensemble Company, Contribution is a brave piece of literature. Written as a three character female –centered play, Contribution is set in the early 1960s in a small southern town.  It was poignant, it was funny and it was a little sad…

The director Nadine Mozon took a very interesting approach to staging the piece; “she enhanced it,” as Dr. Shine said.  Mozon’s enhancement involved adding a citizens ensemble to give a visual effect to moments of description in the play. None of the authors words were changed.  At that time, I had not read the play and turned to the playwright after the reading, “was that in the play?” “No, but I wish I’d written it that way.” Dr. Shine really appreciated that staging of his play.  Earlier I had asked Dr. Shine how he felt about directors and the way they approached his work. He said that there were directors that he could trust with his work and could just leave them alone and they would always enhance the work but he had found out that there were some who weren’t so trustworthy. A playwright needs someone who understands their play and can elevate rather than diminish the piece. I asked him if he felt Ms. Mozon was one of those directors he could trust and he nodded, “yes” with a smile.

I have to agree.  She lit that stage up with her vision and the actors were on point!   Johnique Mitchell as Mrs. Love* was hilarious and amazing; George James gave a good performance as Eugene; the timbre of his voice worked well to give the words a certain undercurrent to the thought of being a black man during that time but being considered a boy – the absurdity of it, the pain of it… Katy played by Kia Malone held the right amount of fear-bred inactivity to give a full view of the times. The ensemble members: Matthew Drake Shrader, Morgan Macinnes, Taylor Joree Scorse, Ava L’Amoreaux, Vincent Hooper, Kelsey Buckley, and Chas Harvey were all the way LIVE! The sheriff! Stole every moment he was animated…The doctor/store owner, the angry mob, the pantomime of the young men at the counter, these visuals made for very lively storytelling.   Even the stage directions were read excellently.  I loved the surprise in this reading which was more like a production.

 

Director Nadine Mozon, also Associate Artistic Director for the conference (standing far left), Johnique Mitchell (standing fourth from left), George James (standing in white shirt), Eugene Lee, Artistic Director of the Black and Latino Playwrights Conference (standing far right), Kia Malone (in yellow sweater far right), and honored playwright Ted Shine (seated) The ensemble members: Matthew Drake Shrader, Morgan Macinnes, Taylor Joree Scorse, Ava L’Amoreaux, Vincent Hooper, Kelsey Buckley, and Chas Harvey and stage crew.

Director Nadine Mozon, also Associate Artistic Director for the conference (standing far left), Johnique Mitchell (standing fourth from left), George James (standing in white shirt), Eugene Lee, Artistic Director of the Black and Latino Playwrights Conference (standing far right), Kia Malone (in yellow sweater far right), and honored playwright Ted Shine (seated). Stage manager: Tommie Jackson III. Stage directions read by Sloane Teagle and Tony Hinderman. The ensemble members: Matthew Drake Shrader, Morgan Macinnes, Taylor Joree Scorse, Ava L’Amoreaux, Vincent Hooper, Kelsey Buckley, and Chas Harvey and stage crew.


 

Ted Shine and a family member after the reading of his play, "Contribution".

Ted Shine and a family member after the reading of his play, “Contribution”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*(Mrs. Love was played by Claudia McNeil in 1970 (the original Lena Younger from Raisin in the Sun)

 

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